Peace

peace/ paz/ paix/ pace/ frieden/ fred/ damai/ barış / ειρήνη/ vrede/ السلام/ мир/ 평화/ 平和/ युद्ध-विराम ...Did you know that our modern day peace symbol began its career in nuclear disarmament?

Seriously. It did.

It was originally created by artist and designer Gerald Holtom, in 1958, for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, in Britain. It’s a combination of the semaphore letters “N” and “D”, for “nuclear disarmament”. Semaphore N is formed by a person holding two flags in an upside down V. Semaphore D is formed with one flag pointing straight up, and the other straight down.

They say Gerald wanted to incorporate the Christian cross at first, but some priests weren’t too keen on the idea.

He also made a conscious decision to not protect or restrict it in any way, which allowed it to spread like wildfire from there. In 1960, a University of Chicago student caught wind of it while traveling in Britain, and convinced the Student Peace Union, of which he was a member, to adopt the symbol as their own. They sold thousands of buttons at many college campuses over the next four or so years. And by the end of the decade, our modern day peace symbol became our modern day peace symbol.

Then a bunch of people tried to accuse it of having less than desirable associations {ie – Communism and Satanism}, but let’s just focus our attention on the good stuff for now.

To your digital success,
K

peace/ paz/ paix/ pace/ frieden/ fred/ damai/ barış / ειρήνη/ vrede/ السلام/ мир/ 평화/ 平和/ युद्ध-विराम … by Donna Cleveland, used with permission under a Creative Commons license.