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What to expect during discovery

ksd. blog | What to expect during discovery
New client engagements begin with a conversation in order to understand what’s happening, see if we can work together, and discern whether we can help. If we feel that we can, we’ll ask for some reading materials about your product and organization, along with a run-through of your technology.

By we, I mean me. Kitty, Founder and Chief UX-er/consultant person, here.

No one has ever admitted it, but I always sensed that our clients either dreaded our discovery process or were completely annoyed by it.

I get it. It feels daunting. You have no idea what you’re getting into or how long it’ll take. Things might not work out. And your struggles will be put under a magnifying glass. There’s no getting around that.

For the record, discovery lasts about a month or two. (It can take less time, but with everyone’s schedules…) I only agree to discovery if I’m 75% certain that it will work out. And I need to hear about your pain points, but I will never use that information against you.

Sound fair so far?

Cool. Here are three more things you can expect during discovery:

  1. Conversations to make sure we’re on the same page with respect to timing, roles, responsibilities, deliverables, requirements, budget and billing.
  2. Conservations to resolve any barriers to entry with respect to timing, roles, responsibilities, deliverables, requirements, budget and billing.
  3. Conversations to work out any kinks with respect to timing, roles, responsibilities, deliverables, requirements, budget and billing.

They can happen in-person, via video, over the phone, or any combination thereof. We might be able to handle it all in a meeting or two, but it’s more like 3-5.

Still feels daunting, I know. But as you can see, it’s worth it.

Now you know what to expect during discovery. With us at least ;)

Until next time,
K

image: Public Domain CC0 1.0

#bookmarked: The Way to Design

ksd. blog | #bookmarked: The Way to Design

“The 21st century will be the designer’s century, because the most interesting innovation is happening at the top of the stack—at the interface with end users—where technology meets design, and where a swipe right or a hold might decide the next breakout business. This book is for entrepreneurial designers who want to know what it takes to start a company, and for non-designer entrepreneurs and executives who want to understand how to make design a core value of their business.”

The Way to Design